Footage Renews Criticism of Mpls Police

Body cam footage from the days following George Floyd’s murder was used to acquit a man charged with attempted murder for firing on the police. In one video officers talk about ‘hunting’ protestors. 

Recently released footage of Minneapolis Police responding to protests in the days after the murder of George Floyd is renewing criticism of the department.

In one video officers say they’re ‘hunting’ protestors:


Officer 1: “Tonight it was just nice to hear, we are going to go find some more people instead of chasing people around we’re going to hunt em’. You guys are out huntin’ people now. It’s just a nice change of tempo.”

Officer 2: “Yup, Agreed”


The footage was picked up by national media outlets, putting MPD back under scrutiny just weeks ahead of a critical vote on the charter amendment for public safety. The video was one of several used as evidence in a case where the defendant – Jaleel Stallings – was acquitted. Another video shows several officers riding in south Minneapolis in an unmarked van shooting rubber bullets at people, at one point striking the 29 year old Stallings.

According to Stallings’ attorney Eric Rice, who released the footage, Stallings had no idea the unmarked car was driven by police so he fired back in self defense with a gun he has a permit to carry.

“The people in the van stopped and started shouting and that’s when Jaleel realized they were officers,” Rice explained. “So Jaleel put his weapon aside and laid on the ground and waited for officers to approach and when they did they started striking and beating him. Jaleel remained surrendered and submissive. He was ultimately arrested and charged with attempted murder for shooting at the van.”

Rice says despite complying with all officer’s commands his client was kicked and punched repeatedly, leaving him with a fracture near his eye and multiple bruises and cuts.

“Jaleel was arrested for a few days, released on bail. He went to a jury trial and the jury acquitted him on all 8 counts”

Rice says Stallings has yet to decide whether or not to sue the city. 

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